PsychNology Journal, Volume 14, Number 2-3, 117 - 133

Applications in cochlear implants and avionic: Examples of how neurometric measurements of the human perception could help the choice of appropriate human-machine interaction solutions beyond behavioral data

Giulia Cartocci∗1,2, Anton Giulio Maglione1,2, Dario Rossi1,2, Enrica Modica1,2, Paolo Malerba3, Gianluca Borghini1,2,4, Gianluca Di Flumeri1,2,4, Pietro Aricò1,2,4 and Fabio Babiloni1,2
1-Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
2-BrainSigns s.r.l., Italy
3-Cochlear s.r.l., Italy
4-IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Italy


ABSTRACT

The availability of indexes linked to distinct mental functions suggests their use in the evaluation of the cerebral impact of human machine interface or devices by measuring the induced cerebral activity. This approach could reveal additional information concerning the efficacy evaluation of the proposed device or interface, beyond the participants’ behavioral and verbal reports. The mental workload index (frontal EEG power spectra increase in the theta band and simultaneous parietal EEG power spectra decrease in the alpha band) is an example of these indexes and in this study it was employed to identify the most appropriate cochlear implant processor in one postlingually deaf 43 years old male unilateral CI user. Results were compared with those obtained in another study involving the selection of the most appropriate devices in a helicopter cockpit. Data showed a statistical significant difference between sound processors (Freedom, CP810 and CP910) (F(2,180) = 3,046 p=0.05. In addition, the trials in which the Noise filter reduction function was adopted reported statistically significantly lower IWL values in comparison to the trials with No noise filter reduction use (F(1,90) = 8,027 p = 0,006). The evidences support the capability of identifying the devices eliciting less workload level. Such devices would free up user’s cognitive resources that will be available for other additional tasks.

KEYWORDS: Cochlear implant, cerebral workload, deafness, word recognition, listening effort.


CITE AS:
Cartocci G., Maglione A.G., Rossi D., Modica E., Malerba P., Borghini G., Di Flumeri G., Aricò P., Babiloni F. (2016). Applications in cochlear implants and avionic: Examples of how neurometric measurements of the human perception could help the choice of appropriate human-machine interaction solutions beyond behavioral data. PsychNology Journal, 14(2-3), 117 - 133. Retrieved [month] [day], [year], from www.psychnology.org.

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PsychNology Journal Volume 14, Number 2-3